Today’s intense work culture has its roots in Soviet mining

One summer night in August, 1935, a young Soviet miner named Alexei Stakhanov managed to extract 102 tons of coal in a single shift. This was nothing short of extraordinary (according to Soviet planning, the official average for a single shift was seven tons.)

Stakhanov shattered this norm by a staggering 1,400%. But the sheer quantity involved was not the whole story. It was Stakhanov’s achievement as an individual that became the most meaningful aspect of this episode. And the work ethic he embodied then—which spread all over the USSR—has been invoked by managers in the west ever since.

Stakhanov’s personal striving, commitment, potential and passion led to the emergence of a new ideal figure in the imagination of Stalin’s Communist Party. He even made the cover of Time magazine in 1935 as the figurehead of a new workers movement dedicated to increasing production. Stakhanov became the embodiment of a new human type and the beginning of a new social and political trend known as “Stakhanovism.”

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Originally published on Quartz : Original article

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